Blog Archive: January 2012

Birdorable Cedar Waxwing

Baby Birdorable: Cedar Waxwing

January 31st, 2012 in Baby Birds, Waxwings 1 comment

If you think our Birdorable birds are cute as adults, what about when they are babies? Below are some baby photos (shared via Flickr) of the Cedar Waxwing. After breeding season, these social birds can be found in large flocks, feeding on berries and bathing together in groups. When it comes to breeding, Cedar Waxwings are relatively late nesters, starting activities in June to as late as August. They build cup-like nests in trees, usually in the fork of a branch. Usually four eggs are in each clutch. Females take care of incubation duties; males stand guard at the nest and provide food for the female.

P1140367
P1140367 by FancyLady | Cedar Waxwing nest
Second feeding attempt
Second feeding attempt by AlanH2O
Waxwing chick in the sun
Waxwing chick in the sun by AlanH2O
Young Cedar waxwing in nest.
Young Cedar waxwing in nest. by Alan Vernon.
Young Cedar waxwings in nest....#2
Young Cedar waxwings in nest....#2 by Alan Vernon.
Cedar Waxwing Feeding It's Young
Cedar Waxwing Feeding It's Young by mctheriot
Young one
Young one by ibm4381

Pretty cute, right? Be sure to check out our Birdorable Cedar Waxwing t-shirts and gifts!

Birdorable Adelie Penguin

Penguin Awareness Day - Penguin Puzzle

Today is Penguin Awareness Day! This commemorative day is always celebrated on January 20th, though the origins of the holiday are unclear. What is very clear is that these special charismatic birds deserve celebration! Many of the world's penguin species face population threats from habitat loss and other environmental strains.

Here are some resources for learning more about penguins:

To get your mind on these flightless black-and-white beauties, we are debuting a new fun puzzle series here at Birdorable. Let's play Which one doesn't belong?

The birds in the image below have a lot in common, but one of them doesn't really belong. Can you pick out the species of penguin that doesn't go with the others, and tell us what the others have in common? Visit the meet page if you need help identifying the birds and finding out which one doesn't belong.

Which one doesn't belong?
Birdorable Black Oystercatcher

Fun Oystercatcher Facts

January 19th, 2012 in New Birds, Fun Facts, Oystercatchers 48 comments
Birdorable Oystercatchers on the beach

We recently added two new species of oystercatcher to Birdorable: the Black Oystercatcher and the Eurasian Oystercatcher. These join our updated American Oystercatcher. Here are some interesting facts about this family of conspicuous, large shorebirds.

  1. There are 11 recognized species of Oystercatcher in the world still living today.
  2. One species of oystercatcher, the Canarian Oystercatcher, went extinct in the early 1900's.
  3. Four oystercatcher species are found in the Americas: Five oystercatcher species are found in Australia or New Zealand:
    • Sooty Oystercatcher;
    • Pied Oystercatcher;
    • Variable Oystercatcher;
    • Chatham Oystercatcher;
    • and South Island Oystercatcher
    The remaining two extant oystercatcher species are named for their ranges: Eurasian Oystercatcher and African Oystercatcher. 
  4. Oystercatchers of all species have stocky shorebird bodies. 
  5. Each species of oystercatcher has black feathers; a few species are black on top with white feathers underneath. 
  6. All oystercatchers have large bills that are either bright orange or bright red. 
  7. Oystercatchers do not subsist only on oysters. In fact, there is great variety in the diets of the different oystercatchers; each has a slightly different bill shape that dictates the foods in which is specializes. 
  8. Oystercatchers nest in scrapes on the ground. Most nest at or near shore habitat. 
  9. The Eurasian Oystercatcher is the lightest species with an average weight of 526 grams. 
  10. The Sooty Oystercatcher is typically the heaviest of the oystercatchers, with an average weight of 833 grams 
  11. Eurasian Oystercatchers are found in both coastal and inland habitats. This is unusual among oystercatcher species. 
  12. The Eurasian Oystercatcher is the national bird of the Faroe Islands. 
  13. Variable Oystercatchers are so named because of plumage variations. They have black bodies with the front plumage varying from all-black to pied black-and-white. 
  14. The South Island Oystercatcher, endemic to New Zealand, is also known as the South Island Pied Oystercatcher; its name is often shortened to SIPO.
Birdorable Wood Duck

Baby Birdorable: Wood Duck

January 10th, 2012 in Ducks, Baby Birds No comments

If you think our Birdorable birds are cute as adults, what about when they are babies? Below are some baby photos (shared via Flickr) of the Wood Duck. You may be surprised to learn that Wood Ducks nest in trees! They are cavity nesters, and will use old tree cavities dug out by other birds, or nestboxes built just for them. Shortly after the ducklings hatch, the mother duck flies out and coaxes the babies to jump down from the nest and join her in the water.

 
Incredibly Cute Baby Wood Ducks
Incredibly Cute Baby Wood Ducks by New Jersey Birds
Incredibly Cute Baby Wood Ducks
Incredibly Cute Baby Wood Ducks by New Jersey Birds
Wood duck and chicks
Wood duck and chicks by John Picken
Baby wood duck
Baby wood duck by Ducklover Bonnie
Wood ducks on a log
Wood ducks on a log by Ducklover Bonnie

Pretty cute, right? Be sure to check out our Birdorable Wood Duck t-shirts and gifts!