Blog Archive: Birdorable Bonanza 2010

Birdorable California Scrub-Jay

Bonanza Bird #6: The Western Scrub-Jay

July 12th, 2010 in Jays, Birdorable Bonanza 2010 4 comments
ALERT: The Western Scrub-Jay was split into the California Scrub-Jay and Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay.
Birdorable Western Scrub-Jay

For 18 days we're adding a new Birdorable bird every day as part of our Birdorable Bonanza 2010. Today's bird is the Western Scrub-Jay! Western Scrub-Jays are members of the corvid family, along with crows and other jays. You can find these blue beauties in western North America, ranging from southern Washington to central Texas and central Mexico. They prefer low scrub and oak woods. These extremely clever birds store surplus food for future use. They are also known to steal food from other birds. They will even take measures to protect their own food stores from other thieving birds! You could say they have some food issues. ;)

Western Scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica)
Western Scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica) by Lorcan Keating

Cute Western Scrub-Jay Gifts

Tomorrow's bird is an Australian finch with rainbow colors. Can you guess what it is?

Birdorable Laughing Kookaburra

Bonanza Bird #5: The Laughing Kookaburra

Birdorable Laughing Kookaburra

For 18 days we're adding a new Birdorable bird every day as part of our Birdorable Bonanza 2010. Today's bird is the Laughing Kookaburra! The Laughing Kookaburra is the largest species of the kingfisher family. These brown and white birds are named for their unusual call, which sounds like they are laughing: "koo-koo-koo-ka-ka-ka!" Although the species is native to eastern Australia, the unique call of the Laughing Kookaburra is often used by Hollywood as a sound effect in jungle scenes - no matter which continent. Have a listen to the call and see if you recognize it!

Laughing Kookaburras are fairly common within their range, often found in suburban or urban settings. They will even become habituated to humans. Last month one Laughing Kookaburra got into trouble after eating too many handout sausages. The bird became so overweight that it was unable to fly! Fortunately the bird was rescued and brought in to "bootcamp where it was expected to recover after being put on a diet and exercise plan.

A Wild and Free Laughing Kookaburra
A Wild and Free Laughing Kookaburra by ianmichaelthomas

Tomorrow's bird is a blue bird that lives in western parts of the United States. Can you guess what it is?

Birdorable Andean Condor

Bonanza Bird #4: The Andean Condor

July 10th, 2010 in Condors, Birdorable Bonanza 2010 6 comments
Birdorable Andean Condor

For 18 days we're adding a new Birdorable bird every day as part of our Birdorable Bonanza 2010. Today's bird is the endangered Andean Condor! Andean Condors are large birds that live in western parts of South America. They are among the largest flying birds, with a massive wingspan which may exceed ten feet! Andean Condors have relatively featherless heads, like other birds in the condor and vulture families. Males sport fleshy combs on the top of their heads and a wattle of skin on the neck. Both sexes sport a white fluffy neck "cowl."

January 10, 2010
Andean Condor by Fabio Mandrioli

Tomorrow's bird is a funny bird from Australia. Can you guess what it is?

Birdorable Prothonotary Warbler

Bonanza Bird #3: The Prothonotary Warbler

Birdorable Prothonotary Warbler

For 18 days we're adding a new Birdorable bird every day as part of our Birdorable Bonanza 2010. Our third bird is the Prothonotary Warbler, a brilliant yellow in the forest. Prothonotary Warblers are among the most brightly-colored warblers. Males are brilliant yellow overall with blue-grey wings. Females are similar, but duller; both sexes have black beaks and bright black eyes. Prothonotary Warblers are named for their yellow coloring. Prothonotaries were clerks in the Roman Catholic Church who traditionally wore robes of deep, bright yellow.

prothonotary warbler
prothonotary warbler by bmajoros

Tomorrow's bird is a large endangered bird that lives in South America. Can you guess what it is?

Birdorable Green Woodpecker

Bonanza Bird #2: The Green Woodpecker, The Green Anteater

Birdorable Green Woodpecker

For 18 days we'll be introducing a new Birdorable bird every day as part of our Birdorable Bonanza 2010. Our second bird is this green anteater, the Green Woodpecker. Green Woodpeckers are a species of woodpecker that lives throughout Europe and parts of western Asia. They are widespread in many European countries, with over half of the global population believed to live in France, Spain and Germany. Unlike other species of woodpecker, Green Woodpeckers feed by foraging for bugs -especially ants - on the ground. They forgo pecking on wood (trees) for ant-hunting, feeding on several different species of ant. They're avian anteaters!

Green Woodpecker (male) in the back garden
Green Woodpecker by Shelley & Dave

Tomorrow's bird is a beautiful little yellow bird that breeds in cavities in North America. Can you guess what it will be?

Birdorable Sandhill Crane

Bonanza Bird #1: The Sandhill Crane

July 7th, 2010 in Birdorable Bonanza 2010, Cranes 6 comments
Birdorable Sandhill Crane

In the next 18 days we’ll be introducing a new Birdorable bird every day as part of our Birdorable Bonanza 2010. The first bird is this Sandhill Crane. Sandhill Cranes are large birds found in grassland and marshes throughout North America. Nesting usually occurs close to water. Their preferred feeding grounds are fields or shallow water; they are omnivorous and find food by foraging, probing into the soft soil with their beaks or hunting small prey.

Baker County Tourism – basecampbaker.com 16871
Sandhill Cranes along the Elkhorn Scenic Byway by Baker County Tourism (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Until July 24th we'll be adding a new Birdorable bird species every day. Here’s a sneak peek at tomorrow’s bird, a green anteater that lives in Europe and western Asia.