Lady Amherst's Pheasant

About the Lady Amherst's Pheasant

Also known as: Chinese Cooper Pheasant, Lady Amhurst's Pheasant

The Lady Amherst's Pheasant is a beautiful, wildly colored bird of the pheasant family. Lady Amherst's Pheasants are native to parts of China and Myanmar. There are feral populations elsewhere, including England.

Male Lady Amherst's Pheasants have extremely beatuiful plumage, with a black and silver head, an extremely long grey tail. Their body feathers range from black to white and red, blue, green, and yellow.

The Lady Amherst's Pheasant is named after the wife of explorer William Pitt Amherst, who first shipped the bird to the west for science.

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Details & Statistics

Added to Birdorable
Hatched on 09 December 2010
Scientific Name
Chrysolophus amherstiae
  • Galliformes
  • Phasianidae
  • Chrysolophus
  • C. amherstiae
Birdorable Family
Conservation Status
Least Concern (as of 5 April 2019)
LC
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Near Threatened (NT)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Critically Endangered (CR)
  • Extinct in the Wild (EW)
  • Extinct (EX)
Source: IUCN Red List
Measurements
Units: Imperial / Metric
39 to 47 inches
Range

International Names

Czech (Cesky) bažant diamantový
Danish (Dansk) Amherstfasan
Dutch (Nederlands) Lady-amherstfazant
Finnish (Suomi) platinafasaani
French (Français) Faisan de Lady Amherst
German (Deutsch) Diamantfasan
Italian (Italiano) Fagiano di Lady Amherst
Japanese (日本語) ギンケイ (ginkei)
Norwegian (Norsk) Diamantfasan
Polish (Polski) bazant diamentowy
Russian (русский язык) фазан леди Амхерст
Spanish (Español) Faisán de Lady Amherst
Swedish (Svenska) Diamantfasan
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