Bohemian Waxwing

About the Bohemian Waxwing

Also known as: Black-throated Waxwing, Waxwing, Bohemian Chatterer, Bohemian Wax-chatterer, Greater Waxwing, Lapland Waxwing, Silktail, Northern Waxwing

The Bohemian Waxwing is a beautiful songbird with a prominent crest. These sleek grey birds live in pine forests across northern North America, as well as northern parts of Eurasia. It is one of three waxwing species found in the world. The others are the Cedar Waxwing and the Japanese Waxwing.

Bohemian Waxwings are mostly brown in plumage, with a gray-brown belly which helps to distinguish it from the Cedar Waxwing. They have a dark mask around the eyes and are named for the wax-like red tips found on some of their wing feathers.

Bohemian Waxwings breed in coniferous forests and move about outside of the breeding season depending on the availability of food. Their erratic seasonal movements mean they may be seen outside of their normal range in the winter months, to the delight of birders.

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Details & Statistics

Added to Birdorable
Hatched on 13 November 2012
Scientific Name
Bombycilla garrulus
  • Passeriformes
  • Bombycillidae
  • Bombycilla
  • B. garrulus
Birdorable Family
Conservation Status
Least Concern (as of 28 November 2017)
LC
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Near Threatened (NT)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Critically Endangered (CR)
  • Extinct in the Wild (EW)
  • Extinct (EX)
Source: IUCN Red List
Measurements
Units: Imperial / Metric
6.3 to 7.5 inches
13 inches
1.6 to 2.4 ounces

Range

International Names

Chinese 太平鸟
Czech brkoslav severní
Danish Silkehale
Dutch Pestvogel
Finnish tilhi
French Jaseur boréal
German Seidenschwanz
Italian Beccofrusone
Japanese キレンジャク [kirenjaku]
Korean 황여새
Norwegian Sidensvans
Polish jemiołuszka
Russian Свиристель
Spanish Ampelis Europeo
Swedish Sidensvans
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Related articles

Bohemians on the move!

Bohemians on the move!

Bohemian Waxwings are on the move this winter! A poor berry crop in their northern range may be driving them outside of their usual winter haunts. Flocks have been seen around southern ... more