Blog Archive: June 2015

Birdorable Common Loon

T-Shirt Tuesday: Loon Ranger

June 9th, 2015 in T-Shirt Tuesday No comments

This new t-shirt design is great for those who live up north and love to observe Common Loons or anyone who conducts loon surveys or runs annual looney birding trips. This cute cartoon design features our Birdorable Common Loon with the funny spoof text "LOON RANGER". The design is shown here on a women's American Apparel t-shirt and is available on many different t-shirt styles and colors. Check out our other Loon Ranger products to find the perfect gift for the loon (lover) in your family.

Birdorable Loon Ranger T-Shirt
Birdorable Whooping Crane

Cutest Nickname Ever: Whoopsie the Hybrid Crane Chick

June 8th, 2015 in Conservation, Cranes, Cute Bird News 5 comments

Crane fans in Wisconsin are talking about a unique chick being raised by a mixed pair of cranes in Horicon National Wildlife Refuge. The chick appears to be the offspring of a male Whooping Crane (identified as DAR 16-11) and a female Sandhill Crane.

The chick, who has earned the nickname "Whoopsie" from crane fans, may be the first of its kind. It is certainly the first documented offspring from a mixed Whooping-Sandhill pairing in the Eastern Migratory Population of Whooping Cranes.

In the 1940s there were just 21 Whooping Cranes left. Since then, groups have been working to save the species and bolster the various flock populations. As of 2011, there were almost 600 birds, including both wild and captive birds.

Whooping Crane DAR 16-11, given the nickname "Grasshopper", was hatched on June 15, 2011. He was costume-reared by International Crane Foundation handlers. At about five months of age, he and his 2011 DAR (Direct Autumn Release) cohorts were released at the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in the presence of wild Whooping Cranes. The wild birds show the DAR birds the migration route from their northern breeding grounds to their winter home in Florida.

Whoopsie the Whooping Crane and Sandhill Crane hybrid chick
Birdorable Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk: New White House Groundskeeper?

June 5th, 2015 in Hawks, In the News 1 comment

Earlier this week, the White House reported the sighting of a new guest on their famous grounds -- a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk.

Red-tailed Hawks are abundant across the United States, and have adapted well to developed areas. Pale Male, New York City's famous hawk, is an example of the large raptor thriving in an urban environment (he and his mate have three young that are about to fledge from their famous nest).

The appearance of a predator on the White House grounds is a good sign for visiting birders, but not so good for any resident rodents living on the property. Red-tailed Hawks prey upon mice, rats, voles, rabbits, and other mammals, as well as other birds, reptiles, and amphibians. This raptor might just earn a spot as a groundskeeper 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Fun Fact: Did you know that the Red-tailed Hawk makes a raspy call that is almost always used in popular media as the voice of our national bird, the Bald Eagle? How appropriate would it be to hear the majestic cry of the Red-tailed Hawk while visiting the White House?


Photo by DJ Patil