Today a striking bird from southern Africa joins Birdorable. It's the Bokmakierie!

The Bokmakierie is a vibrant and charismatic bird that's as interesting as it is melodious.

Native to Southern Africa, the Bokmakierie is a bush-shrike, known for its striking yellow and green plumage and a loud, melodious call. The name 'Bokmakierie' actually mimics the sound of its song, which is a unique way nature names itself! This bird is not only a visual treat with its bright colors but also an auditory delight. Its duets, often performed in pairs with a far-carrying voice and liquid-like song in a back-and-forth pattern, are a common and cheerful presence in scrublands and open grasslands of South Africa.

Once a pair of Bokmakierie get together, both the male and female are involved in building their nest, which is a neat cup shape hidden in dense bushes. They work together from incubation to raising their young, which is a beautiful example of teamwork in the wild.

In a world that's increasingly urban, the Bokmakierie reminds us of the diverse and vibrant life that thrives in the wilderness. If you ever find yourself in the South African bushveld, listen out for the distinctive call of the Bokmakierie. It's not just a call; it's a song that narrates the story of the untamed African landscapes.

Cute Bokmakierie gifts

Bokmakierie at Aghulas National Park in South Africa

Guess tomorrow's bird ...

Get ready to meet our mystery bird for tomorrow! This bird is named after a country. Originally hailing from the wetlands and savannas of Africa, it's made a remarkable journey and can now be found in various parts of the world. Can you guess what bird it might be?

Spot the Differences

The Loggerhead Shrike and Northern Shrike can both be found across North America, so how do you tell them apart? Well, there are three important differences between these two species: 1. The Northern Shrike is bigger than the Loggerhead (one to two inches longer); 2. The Loggerhead Shrike has a shorter beak; and 3. The Loggerhead's black mask extends across its forehead and above the beak, while the Northern Shrike's mask doesn't. Did you know that both the Northern as well as the Loggerhead Shrike impale their prey on thorns to hold them down while it rips them apart with its hooked bill? Pretty gross, eh? It does this with larger prey, such as lizards, mice, shrews and even birds, because it lacks the talons that birds of prey have. So if you see a lizard stuck on a thorn it's probably the handywork of your friendly neighborhood shrike.

Spot the differences between Loggerhead Shrike and Northern Shrike