Warbler Neck Awareness: What is Warbler Neck?

Warbler Neck Awareness Month begins in just over two weeks. You may be wondering, "What exactly is Warbler Neck?" Here is some background information on this unfortunate affliction. Gorgeous warblers in bright breeding plumage migrate through much of the United States during the months of April and May. Spring migration means that birders are on full alert, and birdwatching outings outnumber all other activities. In order to see these colorful little birds, birdwatchers must typically look high up into the trees, up in the canopy where the hungry migrating beauties are most active. The birds are searching for food to fuel their travels. Many are also singing, looking for potential mates and establishing territories. Birding requires patience. Finding a bird that is constantly moving around takes practice and skill. And it means looking up, way up, for an extended period of time. All this sky-high searching often results in a big pain in the neck: Warbler Neck.

Birdwatchers
Birdwatchers by Sugar Pond

The day after your next birding excursion, if you feel aches in your neck, shoulders, or upper back, you can blame the warblers. You've got Warbler Neck. Help spread awareness about Warbler Neck with original WN Awareness gear from Birdorable and sister site MagnificentFrigatebird.com. Stay tuned to both sites for more information about WN.

Comments

Ashira on April 13, 2011 at 9:17 PM wrote:
Have I gone mad, or did you revamp the Cerulean Warbler? :O
Birdorable on April 14, 2011 at 3:10 PM wrote:
Hey Ashira! You're right, the Cerulean Warbler got a little facelift. Our Black-and-white Warbler also has a new look. :)
Ashira on April 14, 2011 at 4:49 PM wrote:
I saw that too! : D They look so nice. ^___^
Nicole ✌ on April 15, 2011 at 11:24 PM wrote:
Do they travel through the west?
Birdorable on April 18, 2011 at 5:12 PM wrote:
Hi Nicole! Sure, lots of warblers travel through and/or breed in the western part of North America. There are some warblers that are more common in the west than in the east.

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