Thrush Rush

We've recently added three members of the Thrush family to Birdorable: the Gray-cheeked Thrush, the Swainson's Thrush, and the Hermit Thrush. These three species, along with the related Wood Thrush and Veery, belong to a group of brown spotted thrushes that breed in North America and present an identification challenge to many birders. Besides their rather similar plumage, these three thrushes share another trait: they are "notable as world-class singers," according to Bill Thompson III's Identify Yourself: The 50 Most Common Birding Identification Challenges. "Their flutelike songs are produced by a complex system of syringeal muscles that are able to create multiple notes simultaneously. These rich vocalizations [...] have evolved to be heard in the thick vegetation of the woodland habitats where these thrushes breed." Hear their beautiful songs for yourself! Do you have a favorite?

These three cute Birdorable thrushes are available on a variety of novelties, t-shirts, and gifts, including neckties (shown with the Swainson's); postage (Gray-cheeked); necklace (Hermit); and iPhone cases (Swainson's).

Comments

Jenna on February 26, 2011 at 7:05 AM wrote:
They are so cute! When I played the songs, my parakeets and the birds outside started singing! I like the Hermit Thrush's song the best!
Louise Warner on February 15, 2017 at 12:13 PM wrote:
what was that?
Louise Warner on February 15, 2017 at 12:16 PM wrote:
i saw a swainson's thrush the other day.they are so cute!

Leave a comment

Comments with links or HTML will be deleted. Your comment will be published pending approval.
Your email address will not be published
You can unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For more information on how to unsubscribe, our privacy practices, and how we are committed to protecting and respecting your privacy, please review our Privacy Policy. By clicking submit below, you consent to allow Birdorable to store and process the personal information submitted above to provide you the content requested.

Crane Extremes! More Facts for Crane Week

We're wrapping up our week-long celebration of cranes with some more cool crane facts. These extreme facts show how diverse this amazing family of birds can be. Oldest CraneThe average lifespan for wild cranes is typically between...

2016 Bonanza Bird #2: Greater Bird-of-Paradise

It's the second day of our 2016 Bonanza, where we're introducing a new Birdorable bird each day through December 4th. Today's new bird is the Greater Bird-of-paradise, a large species found in parts of New Guinea. There are 42 species in...

Kingfisher Extremes

This week, we’re celebrating the world’s kingfishers! There are about 90 species of kingfisher in the world. These darling birds are often colorful, and they can be found all around the world. Join us as we highlight kingfishers on the Birdorable blog this...

Bare-Faced Beauty: The Unique Appearance of Australian Brushturkeys

Happy Thanksgiving! Today's new species isn't related to today's most famous bird, but the name is similar -- welcome the Australian Brushturkey to Birdorable!Australian Brushturkeys are large, darkly plumaged birds with bare facial and neck skin. In males, the...