Blog Archive: November 2018

Birdorable Jabiru

2018 Bonanza Bird #8: Jabiru

November 30th, 2018 in Birdorable Bonanza 2018, Storks No comments
Cute Birdorable Jabiru

Today we introduce Birdorable's version of South America's tallest flying bird: the Jabiru, a species of stork.

Jabiru have an all-white plumage. The head and neck are black and featherless. Another distinguishing feature is a red pouch at the base of the neck. Males and females look alike, though males may be up to 25% larger than females.

Jabiru are found in wetland habitat across parts of Central and South America. They feed on a variety of prey items, including fish, mollusks, and amphibians, generally foraged in shallow water.

Tomorrow's new bird is a member of the puffin family, named for a plumage feature that occurs during part of the year. Do you know this bird?

Birdorable Common Hill Myna

2018 Bonanza Bird #7: Common Hill Myna

November 29th, 2018 in Birdorable Bonanza 2018, Starlings 1 comment
Cute Birdorable Common Hill Myna

Today we introduce a new bird to the starling family of Birdorable, one of the world's myna species: the Common Hill Myna!

Common Hill Mynas are appropriately named, as they are found in hill habitat in their South and Southeast Asia range. They have a wide distribution and are relatively common in their range.

Common Hill Mynas are also sometimes called simply Hill Mynas, and the family name is sometimes spelled Mynah.

These birds are known for their amazing vocal abilities. They produce a wide variety of calls, songs, and other sounds in the wild. Because of their vocal prowess, they are popular in aviculture, where they are known for their amazing ability to mimic different sounds.

Tomorrow's new bird is the tallest flying bird found in South America. Do you know the species?

Birdorable Chipping Sparrow

2018 Bonanza Bird #6: Chipping Sparrow

November 28th, 2018 in Birdorable Bonanza 2018, Sparrows No comments
Cute Birdorable Chipping Sparrow

Today's new Birdorable species is a small New World sparrow: the Chipping Sparrow!

Chipping Sparrows have a widespread range across much of North America, and into Central America. Chippies are migratory through much of their range; some birds in Central America appear to be year-round residents.

Chipping Sparrows usually nest low in trees but have been recorded nesting on the ground or in unusual spots like inside buildings and among decorative foliage. They typically lay 3-4 eggs per clutch.

Chipping Sparrow by California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CC BY 2.0)

During the time when horses were more commonly used as transportation, Chipping Sparrows would be observed gathering horse hair to line their nests. This behavior gave them the old colloquial name of "hair bird."

Tomorrow we'll add a species of myna to Birdorable. These birds are known for their exceptional ability to mimic sounds. Do you know the species?

Birdorable Black-and-chestnut Eagle

2018 Bonanza Bird #5: Black-and-chestnut Eagle

Cute Birdorable Black-and-chestnut Eagle

Today's new bird is an endangered raptor from South America: the Black-and-chestnut Eagle!

The Black-and-chestnut Eagle is a large species of eagle found in mountain habitat across a small range in South America, from Argentina to Venezuela. They are named for their striking black and chestnut plumage, which is complemented by white under the wings and a white stripe on the tail. These birds also have a head crest which is typically in the raised position, even while in flight. The crest may be lowered if the bird is experiencing stress or fear.

Black-and-chestnut Eagles are considered to be Endangered, mainly due to habitat loss. As they are known to eat large birds, including domestic fowl, they also face persecution from farmers.

Tomorrow's new bird will be a small sparrow with a widespread distribution over much of North America. Can you guess the species?

Birdorable Emu

2018 Bonanza Bird #4: Emu

November 26th, 2018 in Birdorable Bonanza 2018, Ratites 1 comment
Cute Birdorable Emu

Today we are revealing our 700th Birdorable species: the Emu! This species has been our most requested bird since we started Birdorable.

The Emu is the world's second largest bird species, just after the Ostrich. These flightless birds are endemic to Australia. They are known for having powerful legs, allowing them to run up to 30 MPH and jump as high as 7 feet. They use their legs to defend themselves as well, pairing a powerful kick with their sharply-clawed toes.

Male Emus take on breeding duties like nest-building and egg incubation. The female may lay up to 15 avocado-sized eggs before leaving them with her partner. Young Emus stay with their father for around 18 months before taking off on their own.

Tomorrow's new bird is a very large species of raptor found in South America. Some consider it to be the most endangered bird of prey in the New World. Can you guess the species?

Birdorable Common Wood Pigeon

2018 Bonanza Bird #3: Common Wood Pigeon

November 25th, 2018 in Birdorable Bonanza 2018, Pigeons & Doves 2 comments
Cute Birdorable Wood Pigeon

Today's new bird is an Old World species and the largest type of pigeon or dove found in Europe: the Common Wood Pigeon!

The Common Wood Pigeon is a large species of pigeon native to parts of Europe and Asia. They are fairly common and abundant throughout their natural range. They can be found in a variety of habitats, including wild woodlands, as well as rural, suburban and urban areas.

Tomorrow's new bird will be Birdorable #700! This is our all-time most requested bird ever. Can you guess what it will be?