Blog Archive: February 2015

Birdorable Ring-billed Gull

Birdorable on Facebook

February 26th, 2015 in Facebook No comments

Did you know that Birdorable is on Facebook? You can follow us at facebook.com/birdorable to keep up-to-date about all things Birdorable. We post new birds, fun graphics, news stories, coupons and new products from our shop. So whether you're a birdwatcher, backyard birder, parrot pet owner or you just love cute birds, head on over to our Facebook page and click "Like" to get all our latest updates.

Birdorable Facebook page
Birdorable Zebra Finch

T-Shirt Tuesday: Zebra Finch Statistics

February 24th, 2015 in Finches, T-Shirt Tuesday No comments

Zebra Finches live in Australia and can be found across most of the continent, avoiding only some cold parts in the south and tropical parts of the north. The birds also naturally occurs in Indonesia and East Timor and were introduced to Portugal, Brazil, Puerto Rico and the United States where the species has established new populations.

Our featured t-shirt design this week is Zebra Finch Statistics featuring a male and female bird next to each other and the main differences and characteristics pointed out, such as the gold cheek patch of the male and oranger beak of the female. The scientific name "Taeniopygia guttata" is shown below. This graphic tee is available in many different styles and colors and can be customized to make a one-of-a-kind gift for zebra finch lovers and bird pet owners.

Birdorable Zebra Finches T-Shirt
Birdorable Eclectus Parrot

Extreme Sexual Dimorphism in Eclectus Parrots

February 19th, 2015 in Parrots No comments
Birdorable Male and Female Eclectus Parrots

At first glance you may think that there are two different species of parrot in the above picture, but these are actually two Eclectus Parrots, with a male on the left and female on the right. The technical term for this is "sexual dimorphism", which in birds is often manifested in size or plumage differences. In birds of prey the female is usually bigger, and in ducks the male often has a much more colorful and complicated plumage than the female. With most birds in the parrot family the sexes are similar, but not in the case of the Eclectus Parrot. Males have a bright emerald green plumage and females are mostly bright red with some purple/blue plumage. Even the bill color is different.

The Eclectus Parrot is the most sexually dimorphic of all parrot species. The difference is so pronounced that the first European ornithologists to see Eclectus Parrots in the wild on their visits to South-East Asia and Australia mistakenly thought that they were two distinct species. In fact, males were first described in 1776 and females not until 61 years later. It wasn't until the early 20th century that they were finally considered one species.

Eclectus Parrot 3
Photo by raider of gin (CC BY 2.0)
Birdorable Belted Kingfisher

T-Shirt Tuesday: Pair of Belted Kingfishers

February 17th, 2015 in Kingfishers, T-Shirt Tuesday No comments

If you live in North America and you love birds then you are probably familiar with the Belted Kingfisher, which can be found across the continent from coast to coast. This cute design features a pair of Birdorable Belted Kingfishers. Can you tell the difference between the male and the female? Both have the cute shaggy crests and are colored blue and white, but females have rufous across the upper belly.

The design is shown here on a blue women's Hanes Nano long sleeve t-shirt, which is made of ultra-light and ultra-soft 100% cotton fine jersey knit.

Belted Kingfisher Pair T-Shirt
Birdorable Hermit Thrush

Vermont's Official State Bird

February 16th, 2015 in State Birds, Thrushes No comments

We've added the state of Vermont to our State Birdorable Birds series. The official state bird of Vermont is the Hermit Thrush.

State Birdorable of Vermont: the Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrushes are known to breed in all of Vermont's counties. Most birds leave the state for warmer climates to the south after breeding season, but each year a few hardy Hermit Thrushes are found in Vermont during the winter (often during the Christmas Bird Count).

The Hermit Thrush was named the official state bird of Vermont in 1941. Apparently during the debate over naming the state bird, some legislators favored other birds, including the Blue Jay, which is resident year-round in Vermont. Also mentioned were "crow" and flying squirrel. Yep, a non-bird was floated as a possible official state bird to represent Vermont!