2013 Bonanza Bird #29: Least Bittern

We’re adding new birds each day until we reach our 500th Birdorable species! Today’s Bonanza bird is species #498 overall: the Least Bittern.

Least Bittern

Least Bitterns are very small herons found in freshwater or brackish wetland-type habitats in the Americas. They are the smallest species of heron found within their range.

Least Bittern comes out to play
Least Bittern by Maureen Leong-Kee (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Least Bitterns are usually found in reed beds, sometimes over rather deep water. They can hunt for small prey like fish, frogs, and insects in water that is too deep for wading birds to enter. They perch on or straddle reeds and look down for prey. If they see something tasty, they stab into the water with their long, pointed beaks.

Least Bittern merchandise

Tune in tomorrow to see #499! Wednesday we will reveal our 500th Birdorable!

Comments

ILOVEBIRDS! on August 5, 2013 at 5:36 AM wrote:
Uhmmm
Louise Warner on March 2, 2017 at 3:49 PM wrote:
what's in the background?
Andrew on November 22, 2018 at 3:59 PM wrote:
least bittern is yellow feathers his name's lily
Spurwing Plover on April 12, 2020 at 4:59 AM wrote:
Least Bittern smallists Heron the one in the picture is a Male reconized by his black cap and back and THE BITTER BITER BITTERN,BIT THE BETTER BROTHER BITTERN,AND THE BETTER BROTHER BITTERN BIT THE BITTER BITER BACK
Spurwing Plover on May 22, 2022 at 5:36 PM wrote:
Male has Black Cap and Back

Leave a comment

Comments with links or HTML will be deleted. Your comment will be published pending approval.
Your email address will not be published
You can unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For more information on how to unsubscribe, our privacy practices, and how we are committed to protecting and respecting your privacy, please review our Privacy Policy. By clicking submit below, you consent to allow Birdorable to store and process the personal information submitted above to provide you the content requested.

Busting a Bird Myth: Can Owls Rotate Their Heads All the Way Around?

As part of our continuing series on bird myths, today we unravel the truth behind a familiar claim: Owls Can Turn Their Heads 360 Degrees. While this statement stretches the truth by nearly 100 degrees, the reality is no less astonishing. Owls are indeed masters of neck...

Introducing the Birdorable Australian Pelican: The Bird with the World's Largest Beak

Today’s new species breeds in Australia with a winter range that extends to nearby islands, including New Guinea, Fiji, and Indonesia: the Australian Pelican. The Australian Pelican has a white body plumage, mostly black wings, and an enormous beak. At up to nearly...

Warbler FAQs

We're celebrating warblers this week! Today we're sharing a few FAQs about this family of birds. What is a warbler? The name warbler is used to describe several different, unrelated, families of birds. So far, for Warbler Week, we have been talking about New World warblers, a...

2020 Bonanza Bird #5: Australian White Ibis

Today’s new bird is an Australian wading species, native to the island nation and now widespread across a variety of habitats. Our second bird in the 2020 Birdorable Bonanza is the Australian Ibis! This species is also known as the Australian...