Blog Archive: 2014

Birdorable Merlin

2014 Birdorable Bonanza Overview

November 23rd, 2014 No comments

For the last 7 days we added a new bird to Birdorable every day as part of our Birdorable Bonanza 2014, which has become an annual tradition that started in 2009. This year was a short one with only 7 birds (or 8 including the Uncape Parrot), but we hope you enjoyed it nonetheless. If you would like to have a look at our bonanzas in previous years you can view those posts here:

Here is an overview of the new birds we added in the last week:

Birdorable MerlinMerlin
Birdorable Song SparrowSong Sparrow
Cape ParrotCape Parrot and Uncape Parrot
PicWhiteFacedIbisBlogWhite-faced Ibis
PicBlackThroatedFinchBlogBlack-throated Finch
Birdorable Ring-billed GullRing-billed Gull
Black-and-yellow BroadbillBlack-and-yellow Broadbill
Birdorable Black-and-yellow Broadbill

2014 Bonanza Bird #7: Black-and-yellow Broadbill

November 22nd, 2014 in Birdorable Bonanza 2014, New Birds No comments

The final new bird species in our 2014 Bonanza is a small, colorful species found in parts of Southeast Asia, the Black-and-yellow Broadbill!

Black-and-yellow Broadbill

The Black-and-yellow Broadbill is one of 15 species of broadbill in the world. Broadbills are found in sub-Saharan Africa and across Asia. The Black-and-yellow Broadbill is a resident species across parts of Southeast Asia, including Indonesia and Thailand.

Black-and-yellow Broadbill - Krung Ching - Thailand_S4E3736
Black-and-yellow Broadbill - Krung Ching - Thailand by Francesco Veronesi (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Black-and-yellow Broadbills make large pear-shaped purse-like nests that hang from tree limbs. The nests may be made from moss and leaf skeletons and be lined with roots and leaves. The clutch size is usually three eggs. The Black-and-yellow Broadbill joins Birdorable today as our 565th species, and our first broadbill. If you like this striking bird as much as we do, be sure to check out our selection of cute Birdorable Black-and-yellow Broadbill t-shirts and gifts. That wraps up our 2014 Birdorable Bonanza! Thanks for following our blog and stay tuned for more new birds to be added in the future!

Birdorable Ring-billed Gull

2014 Bonanza Bird #6: Ring-billed Gull

November 21st, 2014 in Birdorable Bonanza 2014, Gulls, New Birds 3 comments

The 6th bird in our 2014 Bonanza is a familiar species of gull. It's the Ring-billed Gull!

Birdorable Ring-billed Gull

The Ring-billed Gull is a "white-headed" medium-sized species of gull found across much of North America. In fact, it may be North America's most common gull. They nest near bodies of fresh or marine water in colonial groups.

Ring-billed Gull
Ring-billed Gull by Amy Evenstad

Ring-billed Gulls are known for their skilled flying ability. They can be fast, graceful and agile on the wing. Ring-billed Gulls are even known to steal food from other birds -- in flight! They will practice this skill by playing with an object while in the air, dropping the object, and then swooping down to pick it up again. In non-breeding season, Ring-billed Gulls may roost and forage together in very large flocks, sometimes with other gulls. Ring-billeds seem to like their personal space: they will often stand evenly spaced, keeping at least 1 to 2 meters between each bird. The Ring-billed Gull joins Birdorable today, bringing our total number of bird species to 564. Our Bonanza concludes tomorrow with a striking bird of southeast Asia that also has "bill" in its name. Can you guess tomorrow's species?

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Birdorable Black-throated Finch

2014 Bonanza Bird #5: Black-throated Finch

November 20th, 2014 in Birdorable Bonanza 2014, Finches, New Birds 2 comments

The 5th bird in our 2014 Bonanza is an Australian songbird, the Black-throated Finch!

PicBlackThroatedFinchBlog

Black-throated Finches are granivorous, meaning they eat seeds and grains. They are endemic to Australia, where they are found in the northeast of the country, in Queensland. Historically they were also found along the eastern coast down in New South Wales, but their numbers have been declining. The species overall has a conservation status of Least Concern, but the southern population is considered to be Vulnerable by Australian authorities. Black-throated Finches are relatively sedentary (non-migratory), though they may change location in response to food availability during times of drought. The population faces threats from several factors, including loss of habitat from human development and predation by non-native mammals.

_black-throated-finch
Black-throated Finch by Tim Lenz (CC BY 2.0; modified)

To learn more about this species, visit the Black-throated Finch Recovery Team website. The Black-throated Finch joins Birdorable today, becoming our 563rd species. We now have 24 species of finch. If you can't get enough of this darling Australian finch, be sure to check out our collection of cute Birdorable Black-throated Finch t-shirts & gifts!. Our Bonanza continues tomorrow with a New World species that likes to live by water and is named for a feature on its beak. Can you guess tomorrow's species?

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