Blog Archive: Eagles

Birdorable White-tailed Eagle

2022 Bonanza Bird #1: White-tailed Eagle

December 5th, 2022 in Birdorable Bonanza 2022, Eagles No comments
Birdorable White-tailed Eagle

Today we're kicking off our 14th annual Birdorable Bonanza! We're revealing 10 new birds in quick succession, from today through December 14th. The White-tailed Eagle joins Birdorable today as our 766th species, and 51st bird of prey.

White-tailed Eagles have brown body plumage, ranging from light brown on the upperparts to darker brown on the underparts. As the common name indicates, this bird can also be recognized by its white tail. Non-covered body parts, like the large beak and powerful feet, are yellow.

Birdorable White-tailed Eagle merchandise like this unisex sweatshirt is available on Amazon.

Tomorrow we'll add an Old World species of waterfowl named for its color. They are found across much of Asia and have isolated populations in Europe and Africa. Can you guess what our new Birdorable bird will be?

Birdorable Javan Hawk-Eagle

2020 Bonanza Bird #25: Javan Hawk-Eagle

December 18th, 2020 in Birdorable Bonanza 2020, Eagles 3 comments
Birdorable Javan Hawk-Eagle

Today’s new Birdorable is a bird of prey endemic to Indonesia. The Javan Hawk-Eagle can only be found on the island of Java.

Adult Javan Hawk-Eagles can be recognized by their very tall dark head crests and dark brown upperparts. They also have heavily barred underparts. Young birds have little to no barring and are lighter, more rufous in color.

Javan Hawk-Eagles are endangered, primarily due to habitat loss. The population trend is decreasing, and there is currently no plan in place to help the species recover. It is thought the Javan Hawk-Eagle may face extinction in as few as 5 years if a conservation plan is not implemented in time.

Tomorrow we’ll add an endemic hornbill of the Philippines named in part for the color of its body. There are 10 hornbill species found in the Philippines – can you narrow it down to our bird?

Birdorable Verreaux’s Eagle

2020 Bonanza Bird #20: Verreaux's Eagle

December 13th, 2020 in Birdorable Bonanza 2020, Eagles No comments
Birdorable Verreaux's Eagle

Today’s new species is a large type of eagle found across parts of Africa and the Middle East. Verreaux’s Eagle joins Birdorable today!

The species, also known as the Black Eagle, was named for a French naturalist who collected the specimen used to first describe the bird for western science. Jules Verreaux visited Africa in the early 1800s on a expedition for the French Academy of Sciences.

An adult Verreaux’s Eagle can be recognized by its mostly black body plumage, white back, and very large size, all of which makes them virtually unmistakable across their range.

Verreaux’s Eagles have extremely specialized prey; they feed mostly on small mammals called hyraxes. The preferred habitat of the eagle corresponds to this prey preference; they can be found in dry and rocky environments where hyraxes thrive.

Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax by by Berndard DUPONT (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Tomorrow’s new Birdorable has ‘robin’ in its name but it is neither a thrush nor a flycatcher. Can you guess this Australian species named for the color of its breast?

Birdorable Black-and-chestnut Eagle

2018 Bonanza Bird #5: Black-and-chestnut Eagle

Cute Birdorable Black-and-chestnut Eagle

Today's new bird is an endangered raptor from South America: the Black-and-chestnut Eagle!

The Black-and-chestnut Eagle is a large species of eagle found in mountain habitat across a small range in South America, from Argentina to Venezuela. They are named for their striking black and chestnut plumage, which is complemented by white under the wings and a white stripe on the tail. These birds also have a head crest which is typically in the raised position, even while in flight. The crest may be lowered if the bird is experiencing stress or fear.

Black-and-chestnut Eagles are considered to be Endangered, mainly due to habitat loss. As they are known to eat large birds, including domestic fowl, they also face persecution from farmers.

Tomorrow's new bird will be a small sparrow with a widespread distribution over much of North America. Can you guess the species?

Birdorable Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle

2017 Bonanza Bird #1: Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle

November 24th, 2017 in Birdorable Bonanza 2017, Birds of Prey, Eagles 1 comment
Birdorable Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle

As 2017 winds down, it's time for us to reveal some new birds as part of our annual Birdorable Bonanza! This time we'll introduce 12 birds, from November 24th through December 5th.

Today's new bird joins the Birdorable raptor family.

The Black-and-white Hawk Eagle is a large species of raptor found in forested habitats across parts of South and Central America. They hunt a variety of prey items, usually while soaring at fairly high altitude.

Black-and-white Hawk-Eagles are named for their contrasting plumage. The head and chest are white while the back, wings, and markings around the eye are black.

Spizaetus melanoleucas
Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle by Dick Culbert

Tomorrow our Bonanza will continue with a new bird in the corvid family, named for one of its favorite foods. Can you guess the species?

Birdorable Steller's Sea Eagle

2016 Bonanza Bird #3: Steller's Sea Eagle

November 27th, 2016 in Birdorable Bonanza 2016, Eagles 3 comments
Birdorable Steller's Sea Eagle

Our special 10th anniversary 2016 Birdorable Bonanza continues today with the third bird in the series: the Steller's Sea Eagle, a very large raptor that lives in coastal habitats in northeast Asia. These powerful, heavy birds are among the world's largest eagles, along with the Philippine Eagle of the Philippines and the Harpy Eagle of South America.

Steller's Sea Eagles feed mainly on fish hunted in relatively shallow freshwater. They also take other items as prey, including seabirds like gulls, ducks, and herons.

The Steller's Sea Eagle is considered to be vulnerable to extinction by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), and its population is in decline. It faces threats including loss of habitat due to human development and water pollution from industry and agriculture.


Photo by Alastair Rae (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Tomorrow's new bird is known for its special plumage. Its greens are truly green, and its reds are truly red. Can you guess what the species is?